Part 3 – Ankle Injury: “Facing My Fears – Doctors, Tests and Surgery”

In case you missed…

Part 1 – Oops I Slipped!

Part 2 – “Why Does My Ankle Hurt So Much”

As this situation unfolded, it became apparent I was going to require surgery, my greatest fear! We discussed what we thought would be best. We chose to go to an Orthopedic practice affiliated with the hospital my husband works at, he is a Facility Engineer at our local hospital.

I am fortunate that I have a PPO insurance, so I can choose where to go for medical care. Also I was able to get on the phone immediately Monday morning to get appointment scheduled. I was able to get in for the next day. You know it’s never good when the doctor looks at the x-ray disk, I brought with me and says, “You are going to be the most complicated case I’ll see today!” He went on to explain what I did. What I would need, and the next steps. My Greatest Fears playing out!

This doctor saw me I think out of courtesy due to my injury, but he is not their ankle surgeon. Their ankle surgeon was out of town that day. We were given an appointment to see the surgeon the next day, during a Winter Snowstorm! My appointment was a “see if you can fit her in appointment.” We were told that due to the surgeon’s schedule, I would need to be patient because I was being fit in. My appointment was at the end of the day.

The next day, Wed., 2/2 as predicted it snowed heavy. I waited for the doctor’s office to call me, and finally I thought “I am going to see if they have had any cancellations due to the weather?” They did and asked if I could come in early, we got there about 2 hours earlier than my scheduled appointment.

The surgeon concurred with his colleague about the injury, the necessity for surgery. He and his nurse took me to another room where they apply casts for their patients. He removed the splint to examine my leg, the skin, etc. While he and his physician assistant re-applied a new splint, the nurse came in and went over all the pre-surgical instructions with my husband. Those are things like the meds you can take, what has to be stopped immediately, everything to get ready for the day of surgery.

I’ve been asked if I would have gone in immediately to the dr., would my injury not have been so severe? I have injured my ankle numerous times over the years. Lesson Learned for me: When a person falls, bones immediately start to heal. In my case because I did not get seen by a doctor right away my bones started to heal broken, and misaligned. No matter when I went, both my inside and outside ankle bones broke, and everything in between misaligned.

Before leaving I was instructed to contact the hospital to have a CT scan and to see my PCP (Primary Care Physician) who provides medical clearance for surgery.

All these hurdles to cross…doctor appointments, tests and am I medically fit to have this surgery? While all this was going on, I was checking with my health insurance, communicating with my job for FMLA paperwork. All that had to be turned into the surgeon’s office, filled out and returned by a deadline.

FMLA Forms
Messed up Ankle

The CT Scan was done the next morning on Thurs., 2/3. The PCP appointment was Fri., 2/4. At this appointment, labs were done per the surgeon’s instructions, EKG was done. The blessing that came out of all of this…if I did not have the ankle injury, I am in good health!

We have two adult daughters who have been so thoughtful and supportive through all of this. I am blessed!

Stay tuned for my next installment:

Part 4 – Ankle Injury: “Life Learning Begins … My New Normal”

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